Auto Italia, 19 March 2022, 18:00 — 19:00
Josiane m.h Pozi
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Join us for a performance by London based artist Josiane M.H Pozi. Comprising a multimedia installation, pre-recorded footage, and a newly developed script, ‘play’ explores emotions, relationships, and our fallible perceptions of memory and reality.

Following the narrative of  ‘Wife’ and ‘Husband’, ‘play’ depicts a married couple who have relocated from the city to live in a former bed and breakfast in rural England. Taking place in a sparse and abstracted domestic setting, the idyllic vision of a new life in the countryside slowly deteriorates to reveal a couple’s last attempt to save their dying marriage.

An installation of monitors displaying footage portraying the memories and interior monologues of each of the characters accompanies the live performance element of ‘play’. Borrowing from the conventions of reality TV and live-audience broadcasting, the footage on the monitors acts as a visual display of how the characters perceive themselves, and the constant internal narrativising that constructs their ameliorated realities.

Love, expectation, disappointment, interpersonal dysfunction, and the distortion of memory by emotion are explored through fragmented character interactions. ‘play’ reflects the blur between fiction and reality that permeates each of our lives, and is resultant of lives lived partially online. The performance is accompanied by an original score, composed by collaborator Klein.

Josiane M.H Pozi (b. 1998) is an artist based in London. Recent presentations include Galerie Buchholz, Berlin (2021), Carlos/Ishikawa, London (2021), Conceptual Fine Arts, Milan hosting Damien & The Love Guru, Brussels (2021), Stadtgalerie, Bern (2021) and Gandt, New York (2020).

‘play’ is commissioned by Auto Italia, London and co-produced with Arsenic – Centre d’art scénique contemporain, Lausanne. The performance has been made possible by Headline Exhibition Supporters Cockayne – Grants for the Arts and the London Community Foundation, with additional support from Arts Council England National Lottery Project Grants, and a research and development grant from Forma Arts and Media, London.